Categories
Sunday Silliness

Kitchen Drums

This series (The Horne Section) is being repeated on BBC Radio 4 at the moment, and this segment was recorded as a video, probably because it is so visually and technically impressive. Transferable skills!

Enjoy, see you next week!

Categories
Sunday Silliness

Sunday Silliness: Vuvuzela

People seem to have forgotten how big the vuvuzela was for the few short weeks in June 2010. I particularly loved this veideo because of:

  • The novel use of instruments in a musical setting.
  • The completely deadpan delivery.
  • The calibre of the musicians involved.

Enjoy!

Categories
Sunday Silliness

Music would be better without audiences…

The New York Philharmonic, the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States, and also the orchestra with historically the most restive audience members, has announced the planned installation of a new “Listener Speedy Exit Ramp” which will enable to patrons to leave their seats either during or after a performance in less than 2.5 seconds.

via John Adams: Hell Mouth: NY Philharmonic to install new speedy exit ramp for patrons.

Categories
Sunday Silliness

Sunday Silliness: Musical Appreciation

I heard this years ago on an old cassette tape that someone gave me as a birthday present, and it just blew me away. It is so silly, and so unusual, but still has an incredibly clever musicological streak running through it. Perhaps some of it is lost on me due to my lack of baseball knowledge, but it is very entertaining and informative, and worth the almost nine minutes of the video. If you really don’t have time you can skip the introduction and start at 52 seconds in.

Right, so this is a performance of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony, but treated as a huge sporting occasion: there are roaring crowds, pregame rituals, and a couple of very excitable commentators offering player stats (not my pun), discussion of form (ditto) and a blow-by-blow account of what is going on.

As a side note: the man behind the whole thing is Professor Peter Schickele, a musicologist and composer, who often pretends to be P.D.Q Bach, and is one of the cleverest and silliest classical musicians around.

Enjoy!